Islamic Voice
Zul Hijja / Muharram 1422 H
March 2002
Volume 15-03 No:183

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Community Roundup


Doom for Muslim Depositors
Being a Muslim—Kids Show the Way
Wave of Awakening in the Waqfs
Malicious IB Report on Islamic Fundamentalism
Voting for Performance
Honours for Subair
Ameenul Hasan Rizvi
Weaving the Magic of Persian Carpets
Swansong of Urdu Journalism
Facility for Pre-Burial Bath
Majlis Iltihadul emerges as largest Party
IFIE Leadership Camp
Emergency Vets



Doom for Muslim Depositors

The scam in Charminar Bank unfolding in the wake of the chairman's suicide has left
more than 138,000 depositors in a lurch

By Md. Omer Farooq

Hyderabad: Thousands of muslim depositors in the city of Hyderabad face an uncertain future as the biggest financial and banking scam to hit Hyderabad continues to unfold itself in the wake of alleged suicide by the chairman of the charminar urban cooperative bank on Feb. 25. as more murky details of corruption and underhand dealing in the tainted Bank continued to tumble out, a shocked State government got into action. But one question nagging the minds of the people at large is why should the management of a successful 17-year-old bank indulge in such recklessness. Thereby hangs the tale of the fall of the bank, and it has more to do with the Chairman of the Bank, Syed Alamdar Hussain Sajjad Agha whose suicide seems to have written the obituary of the bank.

The controversial and high-flying Chairman of the Hyderabad-based Charminar Cooperative Urban Bank, Syed Alamdar Hussain alias Sajjad Agha shot himself and was rushed to a hospital where he was declared dead. The state director general of police P. Ramulu said that Sajjad Agha shot himself in the head while sitting in his car outside his home in Banjara Hills at around 9-15 am on February 25. His wife Shameem Agha and driver Arif rushed him to Apollo hospital in a critical condition. The shocking incident took place after days of rumours that the Charminar Urban Cooperative Bank was in deep trouble and was facing a serious financial crisis as it was not able to maintain the cash reserve ratio and statutory liquidity ratio fixed by the Reserve Bank of India.

The rumours had triggered off a run on the bank by the depositors who had rushed to the bank for withdrawal of their deposits. The Charminar Bank with a deposit base of Rs. 429 crore in 21 branches in the State capital Hyderabad, Nizamabad and Mahbubnagar had come in focus since the collapse of Krushi Cooperative Bank in Hyderabad last year. It had more than 138,000 depositors, a majority of them Muslims and non-resident Hyderabadis from the old city of Hussain was in deep depression for many days as he was not able to recover the huge amounts of money advanced to several important personalities in the city's social and political circles without sufficient guarantees.

The preliminary inquiries by the RBI, Central Registrar of cooperative societies, and the Crime Branch CID of the state police revealed that the Bank had advanced huge loans of Rs 270 crore. A lion's share of this loan -Rs 185 crore was given to 124 persons, including some leading builders and other controversial and prominent people of Hyderabad. Alamdar Hussain has reportedly left a suicide note behind which include the list of the people who owed huge sums of money to the bank and were not repaying the money on time. What has left the depositors worried are the reports that the Charminar Bank management had not paid the statutory insurance amount which guarantees the return of money to the depositors to a maximum limit of Rs one lakh in case of the closure of the bank. The Charminar Cooperative Bank was founded on 7th September 1985 by Abid Hussein Rizvi, retired deputy registrar of cooperative societies with the aim of working for the economic development of the Muslims of Hyderabad. A large number of professionals and prominent personalities of Hyderabad were involved in the efforts to promote the bank. One of the aims of the bank was to attract the investments and deposits from Hyderabadis working in Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states. The bank has nearly 19,000 shareholders with a paid-up capital of 6.43 crore and a turn over of Rs 8000 crore. In the year 2000-2001, it had deposits of Rs 429 crore, advanced Rs 270.76 crore and earned a profit of Rs 1.92 crore against a profit of 2.14 crore during 1999-2000. The bank had quite a meteoric rise and increased its number of branches to 21. The bank also got the status of Multi-state cooperative bank and its statutory control was shifted from the state registrar of cooperative societies (SRCS) to Central Registrar of cooperative societies (CRCS) under the union ministry of agriculture and cooperation.

Alamdar Hussain, whose family hails from the Shia sect owned a travel agency in Mumbai till 1996 and on his return to Hyderabad, he became the Chairman of the Charminar Bank after the death of its founder chairman Kazim Nawaz Jung Ali Pasha, the son-in-law of last Nizam of Hyderabad. Alamdar Hussain was re-elected as the Chairman of the Bank for the second term in September 2000 amidst allegations of serious financial bungling and irregularities in advances and loans. His critics in the election to the Board of directors alleged that crores of rupees were being advanced to the people without securities for extraneous considerations.

Recently the RBI had also launched an investigation in to the affairs of the bank after several complaints were lodged against the style of functioning of the management of the cooperative Bank. Alamdar Hussain was a flamboyant figure known for his luxurious life style and hob-nobbing with the high and mighty of the city, Alamdar Hussain was nominated as member of the state Waqf Board last year. With three wives, his lavish life style had come under sharp criticism. The attempted suicide by the chairman of a cooperative bank has come as a body blow to the depositors of the cooperative banks in Andhra Pradesh who are already reeling under the impact of the collapse of Krushi Bank and exodus of its chairman to London. Earlier the small depositors from the Muslims of Hyderabad suffered another major blow when a non-banking financial company Saeed Al-Falah had collapsed. Like in the case of Alfalah, what made Charminar Bank a fatal attraction for such families to put all their savings and hard earned money was the high rate of interest offered by them. While the public sector and leading private banks are offering 6 to 7 per cent interest on deposits, the cooperative banks like Charminar Bank and dubious finance companies were luring the gullible people with an offer of 14.5% interest.

As the preliminary inquiries by the RBI and state government revealed, the Charminar Bank had thrown all the prudent norms to the wind. One example: the bank advanced a huge amount of Rs. 270 crore, nearly 185 crore of it to only 124 individuals without sufficient securities and guarantees. In most of the cases of borrowing by these individuals, worthless land of a small village Bodakonda of Ranga Reddy district was shown as collateral guarantee. As per the RBI guidelines, the Bank should have Rs 18.31 crore towards CRR, but it had only 1.40 crore, it should have 84.24 crore as SLR but it had 4.70 crore and Rs 3.86 crore as cash in hand but it had only Rs 2 crore.

While the bank showed a profit of Rs 1.92 crore at the end of 2000-2001, statutory inspection by RBI during October 10 and November 5, 2001, with regard to the financial position of the Bank as on September 30, 2001 revealed that the net worth and the bank's owned funds were eroded to an extent of 71.4 percent as on March 31, 2001. The Bank reported its gross NPA at Rs 63.20 crore which was only 23.2 percent of total loans and advances which stood at Rs 272 crore. Despite liquidity crunch, the bank sanctioned fresh loans and advances upto Rs 30 crore during July-September last year.

The Chief Minister Chandra Babu Naidu ordered the police to impound the Passports of the 124 people who have taken huge loans amounting to Rs 185 crore from the Charminar Bank without sufficient guarantees. Executive Director of RBI, P B Mathur and the Central Registrar of cooperative societies made an on-the spot assessment of the situation and damages suffered by the bank. Asaduddin Owaisi of Majlis Iltihadul Muslimeen (MIM) said that the poor Muslims of the old city were the biggest losers in the fraud by the Charminar Bank. "It is because of the encouragement by the ruling party that such elements have imposed themselves on the community." Both the Congress and MIM were critical of the government's move of making Sajjad Agha the member of state Waqf Board giving him more credibility and respect in the eyes of the people. The Opposition blamed the State government for its total failure in protecting the interest of the people by not taking action against Charminar Bank despite the RBI sending a report in September last year that there was something shady about the bank.

Alamdar Hussain has reportedly left a suicide note behind which include the list of the people who owed huge sums of money to the bank and were not repaying the money on time. What has left the depositors worried are the reports that the Charminar Bank Management had not paid the statutory insurance amount which guarantees the return of money to the depositors to a maximum limit of Rs one lakh in case of the closure of the bank .

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Being a Muslim—Kids Show the Way

"Ba Ba black sheep. Do you pray to God? Yes sir! Yes sir! Allah is my Lord"-
Contemporary education with the Islamic touch is the hallmark of Al-Mu'minah School
where kids pick up Arabic right from nursery!

By A Staff Writer

Mumbai: The Al-Mu’minah School in Mumbai had organised its Annual Function which not only captured the imagination of the audience, but made them proud to be part of it. "Ba Ba black sheep. Do you pray to God? Yes sir! Yes sir! Allah is my Lord. He created the moon and sun. He created us, each and everyone!” This is how the girls of Al-Mu’minah School recited Ba Ba black sheep. A school annual function generally brings to mind some song and dance sequences by children. But the Al-Mu’minah School annual function was a function with a difference. Confident toddlers of Al-Mu’minah, the Islamic Academic School, enthralled the audience with performances ranging from recitation of the Quran to Islamic personality show. The auditorium was resonating with the praise and glory of Allah. Three and a half-year-old Sadiyah Shaikh of Lower KG not only recited the Surah Al-Fateha and Surah Al-Baqarah, but also gave the English translation of both. What was astonishing was that this three and a half-year-old tiny tot understood what she was reciting. When she was reciting “Dhalikal kitabu la raiba fih” and “This is the Book” she picked up the Quran and demonstrated to the audience that indeed Quran is the book wherein is no doubt, a guidance for the God-fearing. The audience which mainly consisted of the parents of the school kids were overwhelmed when the students gave a demonstration of how they spend the day remembering Allah by reciting the duas to be said at different times of the day, right from waking up until going back to sleep. It was indeed amazing to see the small girls recite duas on waking up, before entering the toilet, on leaving the toilet, before eating, after eating, after drinking milk, on wearing clothes, when looking in the mirror and these duas have been learnt by the children with English translations.

Shehnaz Shaikh, Principal of the school, explained that besides the English and Islamic curriculum, at Al-Mu’minah School, Arabic is taught right from the nursery. The Islamic personality show was a winner as the girls of Al-Mu’minah presented themselves as a believing doctor, teacher, businesswoman and judge. The show commenced with the praise of Allah and blessings on the Prophet (Pbuh). They presented relevant Quranic verses with their English translations. Maria Karbhari of Lower KG , recited the verse of Surah Ash-Shu’araa, chapter 26, verse 80 “Wa iza maridtu fahuwa yashfin.” (And when I am ill it is He who cures me.”) The businesswoman, Misbah Shaikh of Lower KG, told the audience that she did not deal in interest-based dealings because Allah says in Surah Al-Imran “Ya ayyuhal lazina a_manu lata’kulur ribaad’afam muda’fah,wattaqullaha la’allakum tuflihun. (O you who believe! Devour no interest doubled and multiplied; but fear Allah that you may prosper.) Maria Hani of Senior KG, reminded the audience of verse 33 of Surah Fussilat in which Allah says,”Wa man ahsanu qaulam mim man daa ilal lahi wa amila salihaw wa qala in nani minal muslimin” And who is better in speech than the one who invites to Allah, does righteous deeds and says, “Indeed, I am of the Muslims?”

In June 2000, Al-Mu’minah School was set up with Nursery and Junior KG with 18 students to provide quality English-medium education in a secure Islamic environment and to impart Islamic knowledge based on the Quran and the Sunnah. In just 20 months, since the school was established, the kids have acquired amazing knowledge about Islam and more than this, they have put it effectively into practice too.

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Wave of Awakening in the Waqfs

Waqf Boards in all States have been asked to gear up and streamline their operations

By Andalib Akhter

New Delhi: The Union Minister for Social Justice and Empowerment Dr. Satyanarayan Jatiya has urged the Waqf Boards all over the country to streamline their functioning in order to generate more income. The minister also asked the Waqf Boards to utilise the Waqf’s income efficiently, so that its benefits reach the community. Talking to Islamic Voice, Dr. Jatiya expressed his dismay over the functioning of various Waqf Boards in the States. “Though the Waqf has immense resources, its income is not being properly utilised”, said Jatiya. He emphasised the need for extending welfare activities especially the education of girls among the Muslim community. Stressing the need for strengthening measures for protecting the Waqf properties, Jatiya said that measures might be taken to get the Waqf properties exempt from Rent Acts. The minister said, 11 States have implemented the Waqf Act 1995, and asked the remaining ones to implement it immediately. The Waqf Act, 1995 was enacted by the Parliament with a view to providing better administration of Waqfs in the country. “The Waqf Council has approved scholarship to 800 students pursuing technical or professional degree courses. The amount of scholarship will be Rs 6,000 per annum to each student,” confirmed Jatiya.

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Malicious IB Report on Islamic Fundamentalism

By A Staff Writer

New Delhi: The Jamaat-e-Islami Hind has termed the Intelligence Bureau report, ‘Islamic fundamentalism and its bearing on India,’ as malicious and concocted. The report has alleged that Muslim organisations in India veered towards an “orthodox brand” of Islam in the mid 70s and they took help from pan-Islamic organisations from abroad to revive the “fundamentalist movement” in the country. The mysterious part is that the report was prepared in 1982 and has been released now. Talking to Islamic Voice, the general secretary of the Jamaat, Mohammad Jafar said the IB report was a malicious attempt to defame the Jamaat as there were many references made to the Jamaat. The news report that appeared in the Hindustan Times recently says, “the seeds of Islamic fundamentalism were sown two decades ago, three of its main features were the increasing clout of Jamaat-e-Islami Hind, the birth of the SIMI and the “subservience” of Indian Muslim leaders to the pan-Islamic agencies. Many Muslim leaders here have questioned the credibility of the report and the intention of it being highlighted after a gap of 20 years.

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Voting for Performance

In the BMC Elections, 20 Muslims Corporators got elected with 10 from the Congress
and 10 from the Samajwadi Party

By A Staff Writer

Mumbai: Its seems corruption in our country is no more an issue and the citizens are not really bothered about it any more. In the recent elections to the Brihan Mumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), the rampant corruption by the Sena-BJP rule was a hot issue as their corruption in the BMC was a documented fact.

The Tinaikar Committee Report has exposed the misdeeds of the Sena BJP in the BMC and had alleged financial irregularities by the saffron combine. Elections were conducted for 10 civic bodies of Mumbai, Thane, Ulhasnagar, Pune, Pimpri-Chinchwad, Nasik, Solapur, Akola, Amravati and Nagpur on February 10. Except Mumbai and Nagpur, other civic bodies were controlled either by the Congress or the NCP. The Sena-BJP alliance emerged victorious in Mumbai, Thane, Nasik, Akola and Amravati. It was behind the Congress by just two seats in Solapur, and got sizeable seats in Pimpri-Chinchwad near Pune. In Nagpur, the BJP has emerged as the single largest party.

Three things seem to tilt the preference towards the Sena-BJP. Firstly, the inability to keep secular votes together. In Mumbai, the poll results show that the Congress and NCP would have grabbed an additional number of 41 seats had they contested the elections together. In these 41 wards, the combined votes garnered by Congress and NCP candidates were more than what the winning candidates of the Sena-BJP combine received. With these 41 additional seats, the Congress-NCP could have easily managed to reach the magic figure of 114 in order to rule the roost in the BMC. Secondly, there was excessive squabbling between the Congress (I) and the NCP to the extent that no party thought that it can form post-poll tie-ups in civic bodies. The Congress and the NCP seem to have frittered away their energies battling each other instead of directing their attack on the Sena-BJP alliance. Thirdly, there was poor turn-out for the poll. An average of 50 per cent was reported in the polls in the 10 cities. In Mumbai, only 40 per cent of the electorate voted.

The NCP is totally decimated in Maharastra, except in NCP supremo Sharad Pawar’s pocket borough Pimpri-Chinchwad. This is the outcome of the anti-Muslim tirade by Chhagan Bhujbal. Muslims who voted for NCP in the last assembly election have deserted the party because of the few decisions of Bhujbal. The Deputy Chief Minister supported POTO, ban on SIMI and opposed the financial assistance to the Malegoan riots victims as suggested by the Congress. Besides corruption, even performance it seems apparently is the criteria with the voters. Just how many of its promises did the Shiv Sena-BJP alliance keep after sweeping to power in the 1997 civic poll? Not many, it would seem. The Muslims of Mumbai have also punished the Samajwadi party for not doing any constructive work inspite of having 21 corporators in the BMC last time. It suffered losses in 11 Muslim dominated wards as compared to the last civic elections. Muslims were angered by the non-performance of the Samajwadi party. The greatest surprise in the recent BMC election was the loss of 11 wards by the Samajwadi party. All these wards had a huge Muslim population ranging from 35 to 60 per cent. Out of 11, six seats have gone to Shiv Sena and one to an Independent and rest to Congress. In all these wards, a large chunk of Muslim votes have gone to Shiv Sena. .It sounds rather strange that Muslims voted for Shiv Sena in large numbers, as Sena is well know for its anti-Muslim stances just like the Sangh Parivar is. In six of these wards, Shiv Sena candidate was given preference by the Muslim voters over the local Muslim candidates of the Samajwadi party. “Local issues dominated the election campaign,” says advocate Shakeel Khan, a resident of Ward 126, in Malad.”For us, local problems are of utmost important, especially sanitation. The Shiv Sena has always helped us in solving these local problems,” he said. No wonder then that despite having 60% Muslim votes, the SP Muslim candidate was defeated and Rajendra Kale of Shiv Sena was elected.

Javed Nakwa, a local trader actively campaigned for the Sena candidate in ward 188 in Chembur where Muslims constitute 50 percent of the population. “ We worked for the Sena candidate, because its local leadership assured us that peace would be maintained here and local issues will be given priority,” he said.

In ward 115, Abdul Rauf Patel, sitting Corporator of SP was defeated by Sena candidate Vishnu Korgankar. With 45% Muslim population, SP was confident about these wards. But Muslim voters rejected SP as they complained that the sitting Corporator was hardly visible when required by the local population. “Inspite of having a Muslim Corporator many a time we had to approach the local Sena leadership about our local problem such as water connection, sanitation or garbage clearance. “They always used to help us,” said Nasir Sheikh a local schoolteacher. Abu Asim Azmi, Mumbai president of SP blames the four-cornered contest between Congress, NCP, Sena-BJP, and SP for the heavy losses suffered by his party in BMC. “Secular votes got divided with the result that the Sena-BJP candidate won”, he said. In the last elections, the Muslim League had many sitting Corporators, all of whom lost, as Muslims voters were angry on their non-performance. The in ward 165 in Kurla which constitute 50% Muslim voters, Sena replaced the SP candidate. Dr Junaid Baig, a general practioner from the area says:. “Muslims voted for the Shiv Sena as the local SP leadership was always fighting amongst themselves. Instead of devoting time to the local problems, the SP leaders were more interested in scoring over each other and infighting came out in the open,” he said.

Muslim voters have sent an important signal to the Muslim politicians that they can no more take them for granted. Neither they can fool around with the emotional issues and rhetoric nor they can be scared by the bogey of a communal party like Shiv Sena.

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Honours for Subair

By KayamKulam Yoonus

Kollam: Veteran Malayalam literary writer of Kerala, Subair was honoured recently under the auspices of Sargavedi. Subair who had released nine of his works earlier has now released 13 works recently This is considered as a record-breaking event all set to acquire a position in the Guinness Book of World Records.

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OBITUARY

Ameenul Hasan Rizvi

By Staff Writer

With the death of S. Ameenul Hasan Rizvi, the renowned Islamic scholar, advocate and journalist, the Muslim community has lost one of its invaluable assets. Rizvi passed away in Bangalore while on a visit. last month at the age of 77. A student of Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) and Osmania University, Hyderabad, Rizvi was an active member of the All India Muslim Personal Law Board and was on its Advisory Council for about 15 years. He presented the Shariah viewpoint before the Supreme Court in the Shah Bano case and pleaded for the Muslims before the Bhagalpur Riots inquiry Commission. Rizvi edited the Radiance Viewsweekly from 1977 to 1985. Rizvi authored the book, Battles By The Prophet (in the Light of Quran), Three Major Errors in Twelve English Translations of the Qur’an, Supreme Court and the Muslim Personal Law.

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Weaving the Magic of Persian Carpets

Through his hard work and courage of conviction, Shabbir Khan has made a mark with his Persian Carpets Export Unit, setting an example that young Muslims can focus on their potential and entrepreneurial skills

By A Staff Writer

Jaipur: Making the best of the opportunities available and adapting to the changes in the market are the key factors responsible for successful entrepreneurship. Muslim entrepreneurs can flourish if they keep in mind the market needs and devise their strategy accordingly to meet the consumers’ demands. A Muslim entrepreneur in Jaipur has successfully built up his unit of Persian carpets and evolved it as a Government-recognised export house over a period of 20 years by sheer hard work. Persian Carpets, functioning from Brahmapuri is today one of the leading manufacturers and exporters of hand-knotted woollen pile carpets and is 100 per cent export-oriented. Shabbir Khan, who had established Persian Carpets in 1979 as a small scale unit, is the moving force behind a dedicated team of 50 full-time employees and about 1,500 weavers working for the organisation on their own handlooms. Shabbir Khan had started the venture after getting sufficient exposure to the business by working in a carpet manufacturing firm for four years.

He thereafter started the work of finishing the carpets of other manufacturers and finally launched his own full-fledged enterprise which has now crossed the figure of Rs.15 crores in terms of annual turnover. The firm’s foreign exchange growth rate has also been tremendous. During 1998-99, its net sale had registered a record jump of 298 per cent as compared to the previous year.

Shabbir Khan bagged the “Niryaat Shri” award of the Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO) in 1999 in recognition of his achievements on the export front. He has been recently appointed the Vice-Chairman of the Carpet Export Promotion Council, established by the Union Ministry of Textiles. His story of struggle to rise in the business is an inspiring saga for the Muslim youth, many of whom often complain of the lack of opportunities. “Opportunities are created by man himself. The simple formula for success is to prepare oneself to meet the challenges and then launch a relentless struggle,” Shabbir Khan told this correspondent, while pointing out that he used to work all through the night when his father passed away in 1969 and he was still in school.

Persian Carpets offers a competitive price range of the products comparative with the international market rates in addition to exclusive selection of programmed hand-knotted high quality collections and modern designs. The firm chiefly manufactures hand- knotted woollen carpets, woollen and cotton durries for export.

Shabbir Khan has explored the overseas markets in the United States, Germany, Spain, Belgium, Holland, Netherland and South Africa by building up on his contacts.

The carpets are manufactured on looms which are operated manually in accordance with the given design charted out on a graph paper providing exact details of colour and pattern. The wool is procured as raw wool which is spun to the desired thickness and later dyed as per the requirements. Carpet manufacturing takes time according to the size to be dismounted and the raw carpet is further subjected to washing and clipping before it is ready for export.

According to Shabbir Khan, his business faced some difficulty during September and October last year following the terrorist attacks in the US, but has now come back on the right track. As a Government-recognised export house, his unit has refrained from over-production without caring for quality which, he says, leads to decline in prices.As part of his philanthropic works, Shabbir Khan regularly helps the educational institutions in the city and presents himself for any major project for the benefit of the community.

He has helped establish couple of non-formal education centres for children of poor weavers on behalf of Carpet Export Promotion Council. Shabbir Khan’s rise from a humble businessman to the eminence in exports in the State has all the elements that can inspire the younger generation of the community. Patience, hard work and capacity to take right decisions are the virtues which the Muslim youth should acquire to succeed in life.

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Swansong of Urdu Journalism

The closure of the Urdu journal Shama ends an epoch in Urdu journalism in North India, as almost all popular Urdu journals have folded up in the traditional heartland of Urdu

By A Staff Writer

New Delhi: Shama, the popular Urdu monthly for several decades wound up in January, 2002, after 60 years of continuous publication. Though primarily, a film magazine, it catered to Urdu literary circles in North India and was successfully run by the Dehlavi family belonging to the Punjabi Muslim community in Delhi. It was at its zenith during the 1960s and the 70s. The decline began in the 80s as the old Urdu-reading generation of Muslims in North India approached the retirement age. Next two decades saw a fast decline. The closure followed the death of its editor Idris Dehlavi on November 20, 2001. Shama’s bowing out almost ends an epoch in Urdu journalism in North India as almost all popular Urdu journals have folded up in the traditional heartland of Urdu. Shama was known for its refined literary taste and introduced several Urdu writers such as Krishan Gopal Abid, Farhath Ejazi, Sayeed Amrit, Ravinder Singh, Siraj Anwar, C L Kavish, Matheen Naim, Masroor Jehan, Nayeema Zia, Sheen Muzaffarpuri, Anwar Kamal Hussainy, Izhar Asar, Akhtar Adil Roop and Qazi Mushtaq Ahmed. Shama gained popularity through its Shama Literary Puzzles (Shama Adabi Muammah). The magazine was a harmonious blend of successful commerce and popular journalism. Shama was the most widely known publication House in Urdu. At one time, it had been publishing the children’s monthly Khilauna, women’s monthly Rubi, mystery novels Mujrim, Hindi film monthly Sushma, and Shabistan Urdu digest. But they began to fold up one after another. Shama’s closure has come as a swansong for the Shama group of publications.

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Facility for Pre-Burial Bath

Bangalore: The Jumma Masjid Trust here has set up a facility for giving pre-burial bath to the dead bodies. Claimed to be the first of its kind in India, the 50ft by 70ft facility has provision for bathing two male and two female bodies at a time in separate enclosures. The facility has come up in the Quddus Sahib Graveyard in the Jayamahal locality of the city. According to Syed Masood, secretary of the Trust, the building for this facility was constructed at a cost of Rs. 28 lakh. For further details, contact the manager on : 5596099 or Jumma Masjid, Jumma Masjid Road, Bangalore-1.

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Majlis Iltihadul emerges as largest Party

By A Staff Writer

Hyderabad: The division of Majlis votes between the candidates of Majlis Iltihadul Muslimeen (MIM) and Majlis Bachao Tahreek led to the election of a Telugu Desam candidate as Mayor of Hyderabad. Telugu Desam candidate, T Krishna Reddy was elected the Mayor by a majority of 21,000 votes. While Reddy received 362,119 votes, MIM's Meer Zulfiquarullah got 340,585 votes. Majlis Bachoa Tahreek's candidate Dr. Qaim Khan secured 38,816 votes. It may be recalled that Majlis Bachao Tahrik is a splinter from the MIM following personal differences between leaders of the two parties. In the civic elections for the Hyderabad Municipal Corporation held recently, the Congress (I) candidate D. Nagendra secured 226,975 votes. The MIM emerged the largest party in the 99-member Corporation with 36 Corporators. Telugu Desam came second with 22 members, BJP 15, Congress 20, Majlis Bachao Tahreek (MBT) won on two seats while others shared five seats. MIM has 15 women corporators. Among the Congress and TDP Corporators, Muslims have just one Corporator each.

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IFIE Leadership Camp

Ahmedabad: The Institute for Initiatives in Education (IFIE) will be holding its National level leadership Camp in Manali in Himachal Pradesh between May 20 and June 1, 2002. The Camp is aimed at enhancing self-awareness and dissolving inhibitions within one’s self and removing blocks within. The programme is open to youth in the age group of 18-25 years. A fee of Rs 2000 will be charged. For details, contact: Dr Hanif Lakdawala, Sanchetana, 0-45, 46, 4th Floor, New York Trade Centre, Near Thaltej Cross Road, Sarkhej-Gandhinagar Highway, Ahmedabad-380054. Ph: 91-79-7437848. Fax: 91-79-7423195. Email: ifieahd@ad1.vsnl.net.in/ ifieahdad1@sancharnet.in

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Emergency Vets

Muslims of Mumbai were saved from the agony of witnessing their sacrificial animals dying due to lack of proper treatment, as for the first time, veterinary doctors chipped in with their selfless service

By A Staff Writer

Mumbai: Id-ul-Azha or Bakrid brings with it the spirit of true sacrifice and all Muslim dominated areas are flooded with sacrificial animals like goat, sheep and bullock. Due to the lack of adequate space and high humidity in Mumbai, number of animals fall sick and many die before they are sacrificed. For the first time, this year, vets were visible in the Muslim localities offering treatment for the sick animal. Even choice was available between Allopathic and Unani medicines. Hamid Akre, a vet, who had put up his stall at Mohammed Ali road said: “I had specially come from my native village to Mumbai as I came to know that many sacrificial animals fall sick and even die as they are not treated on time.” Musa Memon lost his sacrificial goat last year due to diarrhoea.” Just four days before Bakrid, my goat had severe diarrhoea. I gave it natural medicine, but it died one day before Idd,” he said. Asraf Merchant also lost his goat last year due to a mysterious illness. “We gave Terramycin, but it did not respond and we lost the animal,” he said. Akre said that change in climate and stress during travelling are the major reasons why animals die. “My desire to come to Mumbai and serve the animals is not for money, but I want to help my brothers in the urban areas,” he said. Mansoor Shah had displayed a slew of plant medicines for the animals. “I charge as per the ailment. For minor problem, it costs Rs 20, for any major problem I charge Rs 300,” he said.

Thanks to these selfless vets, this year, Muslims of Mumbai were saved from the agony of witnessing their sacrificial animals dying due to lack of proper and adequate treatment. As a result, the casualty of sacrificial animals this year was far less as compared to last year.

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